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Seaton Hiking Trail

My British blood means that there is a very specific range of temperatures between which I am comfortable and willing to leave the house. That range falls between one-degree with several jumpers and about room temperature with slightly less jumpers. Anything outside of this range and I would rather be hibernating like an angry bear. However, autumn is soon upon us, and so revives my hiking.

ASeaton Trail Maplthough I would like to get back to my self-imposed springtime challenge of walking the length of The Don (read about that here), over the last couple of days, I have been walking The Seaton Trail.

The trail is located north-west of Toronto. It is about 13km (8 miles) long. There is a logistical issue with this trail that will make it more difficult than The Don.  There is no public transport. I will have to park my car, walk some trail, but then walk back to my car, thus doubling the length of the trail. At the time of writing, I have walked about half of the trail in two short days.

Day One

The Northern end of the trail begins just off Highway 7, east of York Durham Line (for Brits, this is the road that splits York “county” and Durham “county”). It’s about 30 minutes drive from where I live and there is a small parking area which was about three-quarters full when I arrived around 2pm.

jewelweedAs I began making my through the dirt trail, I rounded a marshy area with a small creek which was lined with Spotted Jewelweed, a yellow./orange flower speckled with darker spots. I was thinking to myself that they reminded me somewhat of the Snapdragon plant that is familiar to me from England, when I spotted a Ruby-Throated Hummingbird drink from one of the conical flowers, as silent and elusive as a wisp. It quickly zipped away, followed by a second hummingbird.

stairsI marched onwards. The terrain is easy, but there are occasional wooden steps to navigate as the trail rises up the valley walls, carved by the West Duffins Creek and the retreat of the Glacial Lake Iroquois which formed the water systems throughout Ontario around 13,000 years ago.

whitevalewaterfallThe weather was a little damp with occasional spitting rain, and so animal life was sparse, beyond a few brave Chickadees and an obstinate Crow. The trail ended at Whitevale Road due to bridge construction, but my GPS unit, with the trail marked on my map, showed that the trail had a loop. I took the other loop back to the start of the trail and eventually came to Whitevale Pond and a waterfall. A re-visit to this area during the spring of 2016 is called for, as I have since heard that Salmon make their return journey along this waterway, attempting to jump the waterfall. I disturbed a beautiful, prehistoric looking Great Blue Heron as I made my way around the pond. He flapped lackadaisically away towards some distant perch.

whitevalepond

Day Two

I returned from where I had left off, near to Whitevale Road, about a week later. I was apprehensive at first. It was a whopping 26 degrees out, way above my usual threshold, but the day turned out to be a perfect for a walk in the woods.

I walked through the dew covered grass of Whitevale Park towards the trail, which was beautifully sun-dappled, thanks to the Maple and Fir. Each time a range of denser Fir began, the sound of scalding chickadees fluttered through the forest and the squealing, squeaking alarm of chipmunks as they would dash impulsively to the nearest tree. From their vantage point on the offside of a tree trunk, they would freeze, staring at you, almost certain that they were invisible to your threat.

fernforest

Into the denser woodland, the floor coated in pine needles and fern, a distant, gentle “queedle” of two Blue Jays, a bird now considering its southward migration before the arrival of the unrelenting snow. Off the trail, the trees mostly left to their devices, some felled birch trees, their silver bark like wallpaper for the ground. Somewhere close by, a nuthatch, his unmistakable nasal report.

Several American Red Squirrels were fighting over the right to acorns and territories, all the better to store their horde for the harsher times ahead. No time to waste. As the trees thinned out, banks coated with Bur-Marigold were enjoyed by the community of bees, a species we now love but maligned for so long. And then, on top of a ridge, a vista of the creek.

vistacreek

The trail turned towards some open fields. Lined to the right by expired maize, to the left, apple trees whose deposited fruit sweetly perfumed the air. The trickling sound of the river, like a babbling brook, its sound emanating from the shallow riverbed of stones, rounded from decades of erosion.

daisyBeside the trail, some areas overtaken by white, yellow and purple weeds, Daisy Fleabane, Aster and Goldenrod, beloved by the insects that made this their home. Cabbage White Butterflies flew excitedly around, battling gentle breezes. A pale-yellow bodied dragonfly with neon blue wings.

I turned back once I reached Whites Road. There is parking here, so I will continue on at a later date. On my way back along the trail, back up in to the open fields, a pair of Turkey Vultures soared the hillside thermals in search of, perhaps, an unlucky squealing chipmunk. Some time later, back towards my car, a flash of yellow and a streak of black. A warbler, but my binoculars were in the car. A Blackburnian Warbler, I fancied. One of my favourites.

Parts 3 and 4? to follow.

Day One GPS Tracks: http://alltrails.com/tracks/sun-13-sep-2015-13-18
Day Two GPS Tracks: http://alltrails.com/tracks/fri-18-sep-2015-15-37

Beaver 1859 – Scott 15

I have a confession to make. I have been collecting stamps for around five years. This obsession began when I randomly bought a 1kg bag of randomly mixed stamps from E-Bay. Stamps bought in this fashion are called “kiloware”, and getting some seemed like a great idea at the time. I’m still sorting through the last of that bag (cataloguing kiloware is an arduous process), but I’ve been gathering stamps, usually better quality, from various other sources in the meantime.

Unless you are The Queen (whose family have collected stamps from The Commonwealth for generations), it would be folly to try to collect everything. I’m not one who is usually dissuaded by that which might be considered folly, but in the interests of my bank balance, I stick to collecting Canadian and British stamps. But if something turns up from somewhere else, I’ll surely find a spot for it.

When I come across an interesting stamp (or postcard, as I acquire these, too) I will blog about it.

Beaver-1859-scott15.pngThe oldest stamp that I currently own is the famous Beaver stamp. There are actually a few varieties of beaver stamp. The earliest are from 1851 and were issued by “The Province of Canada” (the merger of Upper Canada and Lower Canada), preceding Canadian Confederation in 1867. They had a face value of 3d (three old pence), were the first stamps considered Canadian (despite being before confederation) and were the first stamps anywhere to have an animal on them. They were printed onto laid paper, which is paper that has a ribbed texture as a result of the manufacturing process. This made them less than ideal for sticking to mail/post.

The 1859 stamp that I own (pictured above) is “used” and far from perfect. It has a face value of 5 cents (cents were introduced as currency in 1858). It has perforated edges, unlike older issues. The stamp was printed by the American Bank Note Company and it is the last stamp ever issued for The Province of Canada.

The Province of Canada (essentially Ontario and Quebec), New Brunswick and Nova Scotia stopped producing their own stamps at the formation of The Dominion of Canada, and the first stamps issued by The Dominion were in 1868.

Prince Edward Island issued its last stamps in 1872 (joined Canada in 1873)
British Columbia issued its last stamps in 1869 (joined Canada in 1871)
Newfoundland issued its last stamps in 1947 (joined Canada in 1949)

Taylor-Massey Creek Trail

Spring is here and so my hiking escapades have begun. Last Wednesday, I took a walk along part of The Taylor Massey Creek. I used to live beside this creek when I first moved to Canada and lived with my Grandmother-in-law. The creek (stream) runs behind her house (and was excellent at helping to attract birds to the garden).

Taylor Massey MapThe Taylor-Massey Creek starts at Pharmacy, just south of the 401 where storm water run-off enters a couple of ponds. While still narrow, it runs mostly south along a hydro-corridor (government land that over-ground power-lines run through) before, unfortunately, disappearing through private land and then underground until it reappears around Eglinton Avenue, through Pine Hills Cemetery (good birding!) and then through Warden Woods Park. It becomes inaccessible for a stretch through a golf course, before entering Taylor-Massey Park. Eventually it joins The Don River.

The Creek is named after the Taylor family, who emigrated to Upper Canada from Uttoxeter, Staffordshire. Originally living in Vaughan, they moved to what is now Toronto in 1834, ran a paper mill on the Don River and helped pioneer the use of wood pulp, instead of rags, as a paper source.

Daniel Massey, whose parents were from Cheshire before they emigrated to Massachusetts and later Upper Canada, was a blacksmith in Newcastle, Ontario. He founded the Newcastle Foundry and Machine Manufactory company in 1847. His son, Hart Massey, moved the annamassey_davidjasoncompany to Toronto. It has merged or been bought several times, but farming equipment bearing the name Ferguson-Massey is still made today by AGCO. Hart Massey was a philanthropist whose will helped to create the Massey Foundation in 1918. The Ferguson-Massey company funded the building of Massey Hall, which was later renovated using Massey Foundation funds. Hart’s grandson, Vincent Massey, was Governor General of Canada between 1952-1959. He founded Massey College and The Massey Lectures. Some of the descendants for the family have been actors in The UK (Anna Massey – Darling Buds of May, Daniel Massey – The Devil’s Advocate) and Canada (Walter Massey).

I have walked most of the length of the Taylor-Massey Creek before, where possible.,This time I walked from the golf course to where the creek enters the Don River. It was pretty quiet with just a few dog walkers and not much bird activity. Male Red-winged Blackbirds have begun to appear (they claim territory early in the mating season before the females also return from their southern migration). There were lots of active Downy and Hairy Woodpeckers, a few nuthatches and a plethora of Black-Capped Chickadees.

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My next plan is to walk the length of the Don River to where it enters Lake Ontario. Stay tuned….!

Bestview Park

leafpathTook a ride/trip over to Bestview Park after hearing reports of a Pileated Woodpecker in the area. The park is located at the northern edge of The Greater Toronto Area at Bayview Drive, south of Steeles. I walked south through the park, through woodland, along a trail that follows The Don River. I spotted a couple more salmon, though they were about as active as a pair of bricks. Probably a good spot for next year, as there was a dam that would require jumping.

No joy finding the Pileated Woodpecker, but did see a few Downy Woodpeckers and possibly a Hairy Woodpecker – couldn’t be sure. Although the end of Fall/Autumn is in sight, the colours are still beautiful.

At one point, a hawk (a red-tailed hawk, I believe) swooped overhead.

hawk

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